Migrating North ...

Searching for Equality

Grades 3 - 8



Lessons

During the late 19th century, many former slaves moved their families north to Boston. In terms of civil rights, Boston was a progressive city that had passed civil rights legislation in 1885. But even with these civil rights laws, was there really equality for all?

The lessons in this unit explore what lives were like for African Americans of this era.

The first three lessons introduce the lives of three successful men. Each of these men attended Ivy League schools and then settled in Boston to begin their careers.
  • William Henry Lewis became a lawyer and became the first black assistant attorney general for the United States. He was also the first black lawyer to argue a case in the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • Matthew Washington Bullock also became a lawyer and had a long career in public service including time with the Boston Urban League, Special Assistant Attorney General for Massachusetts and member of the Massachusetts Parole Board.
  • William Monroe Trotter published the African American newspaper called 'The Guardian' whose major goal was to fight for equal rights.

In the final lesson, students have the opportunity to discover what life was like for many of the people who migrated north by viewing the art of the period called the Harlem Reniassance


There’s No Place Like North -- Inmaculada Peters Mapping Matthew Washington Bullock -- Lisa DiSalvatore The Use of Free Speech to Effect Social Change: William Monroe Trotter and Voltaire -- Larry Higgins 'One Way Ticket': A Study of the Great Migration and the Harlem Renaissance 1900- 1920 -- Deborah Corleto
There’s No Place Like North

Created by:
Inmaculada Peters, Kelly School, Chelsea
Mapping Matthew Washington Bullock

Created by:
Lisa DiSalvatore, Lafayette School, Everett
The Use of Free Speech to Effect Social Change: William Monroe Trotter and Voltaire

Created by:
Larry Higgins, Salemwood School, Malden
'One Way Ticket':
A Study of the Great Migration and the Harlem Renaissance 1900- 1920


Created by:
Deborah Corleto, McGlynn Middle School, Medford
Background Image:

Walling and Gray's map of the United States and territories, 1871.
Courtesy of the Boston Public Library Norman B. Leventhal Map Center.