Biology

Comparing Plant and Animal Cells

Lesson Plan

State Standards:

biological cell

 

1. Compare and contrast plant and animal cells, including major organelles (cell membrane, cell wall, nucleus, cytoplasm, chloroplasts, mitochondria, vacuoles)
2. Recognize that within cells, many of the basic functions of organisms (e.g., extracting energy from food and getting rid of waste) are carried out. The way in which cells function is similar in all living organisms.

Essential Question:

How are plant and animal cells different from each other and how are they similar to each other?

Lesson Question:

How are plant and animal cells organized so that all basic functions of living things are able to take place within them?

Introduction:

You have been hired by Scholastic Science to develop an interactive "e" poster that shows middle school students how plant and animal cells are different and how they are similar. Before creating the poster you will spend some time making you sure you know about cells, the differences between plant and animal cells and the importance of energy in cells. It is very important that the "e" poster vividly shows students that all living things contain mitochondria in their cells so that glucose can be transformed into energy that the cell can use.

Task:

You will create your own "e" poster that shows how plant and animal cells are different from each other and similar to each other.

Lesson Experiences:

#1 You will be given laptops and a Venn diagram ( one per student) You will study the pictures below of an animal cell and a plant cell at the following website:

Plant and Animal Cell

Working with members of your group you will build a Venn diagram to show similarities and differences. The Venn diagrams will then be shared using the document camera.

After some discussion, of similarities and differences you will research on the web the reasons for the differences and write about them in your science notebook. This research will also be shared with your class using the document camera.

Lastly, you will provide a written explanation about why both cells have mitochondria when a plant cell is able to make their own food for energy. You will not use the Internet to answer this question, but you can collaborate with your group. Responses will once again be shared using the document camera.


#2 Watch the following videos about cells and then choose one word or phrase that you learned about cells and post them on your class
wiki page. Your word(s) will be turned into a "Wordle" for your class.

Wordle Website

#3 You will visit the following website:

Glencoe Interactive Cell Activity

Glencoe Interactive Cell Activity

Be sure to carefully read about the differences between animal and plant cells and then complete steps 1-7 in the Procedures Section. Be sure to answer the journal questions in complete sentences and then print out your answers. You may use your textbook and the web to help you to answer any questions you have during this activity.

#4 Go to the following website and read the summary about cellular respiration. Write a paragraph, no longer than 5 sentences, that summarizes your understanding of cellular respiration and demonstrates that you understand that both plant and animal cells undergo cellular respiration. This will be done for homework and collected the next day.

Cellular Respiration

#5 Go to the Glogster website and learn about making "e" posters.

Glogster

#6 Develop an electronic poster that shows how plant and animal cells are similar and how they are different. Be sure to use the following rubric when creating your Glogster poster.

Conclusion:

You have learned the differences between an animal cell and a plant cell through various learning experiences. You should be able to readily state that plant cells have cells walls and chloroplasts while animal cells do not. You also learned that both cells transform glucose into energy through a series of chemicals reactions known as cellular respiration that takes place in the mitochondria. This information supported our earlier study of the "needs of living things" and will re-emphasized the point that all living things need energy.

Assessments:

There will be formative assessments during experiences #1 - #4. Your Glog is a summative assessment. Use the rubric above for assessment standards.

Animal Cell vs Plant Cell
Glog Rubric

Required Content

Strong

Good

Adequate

Inadequate

Points

Score

Diagrams of Animal and Plant Cells are properly labeled with the following organelles: cell membrane, cell wall, cytoplasm, nucleus, mitochondria, vacuole, and chloroplast

Diagram provided with all required organelles and one extra organelle

Diagram provided with required organelles

Diagram provided, but missing one or more required organelles

Wrong Diagram or No Diagram

20

Function of each organelle is described in detail and an analogy is provided that is written in the students own words.

Function & analogy is detailed for required organelles and this information is provided for an extra organelle

Function & analogy is detailed for required organelles

Most functions & analogies are provided, but missing one or more for required organelles

Most functions or analogies are not provided

15

A letter from a plant cell to an animal cell, a cartoon, or a poem is provided that clearly shows three similarities between a plant and an animal cell.

Description of similarities is thorough, written in student's own words, and includes one extra similarity.

Description of similarities is thorough and written in student's own words.

Only 2 similarities are provided and/or the description is not written in student's own words.

Only 1 similarity is provided.

20

A letter from a plant cell to an animal cell, a cartoon, or a poem is provided that clearly shows two differences between a plant and an animal cell

Description of differences is thorough, written in student's own words, and includes one extra similarity.

Description of differences is thorough and written in student's own words.

Only 2 differences are provided and/or the description is not written in student's own words.

Only 1 difference is provided.

20

Brain Bender- Choose an organelle and explain what would happen to the cell if the organelle did not exist.

Thorough & accurate description (3 or more sentences) relating the ability of the cell to maintain homeostasis with missing organelle

Brief & accurate description relating the ability of the cell to maintain homeostasis with missing organelle

Thorough but inaccurate description of impact of missing organelle

Incomplete response

15

Written work shows attention to capitalization, organization, punctuation, and spelling.

No spelling, punctuation, or grammatical mistakes.

Few spelling, punctuation, or grammatical mistakes,

Many spelling, punctuation, or grammatical mistakes.

Numerous spelling, punctuation, or grammatical mistakes.

5

Overall Design
Glog is well organized and shows ability to balance objects & scale, to use appropriate size lettering, and to choose colors that allow for easy reading.

Poster is neat and organized.

Poster is some what neat & organized.

Poster appears disorganized.

Poster disorganized and missing required content areas.

5

Total

 

Resources:

laptops, printer, projector, science notebooks.

Glencoe Virtual Labs, Interactive Cell Activity: “How do animal and plant cells work?”

Anaerobic Respiration Articles, “Cellular Respiration”

Glogster

Wordle

Teacher Notes:

Also coordinate with the school librarian to teach a lesson on using Glogster.

Image credit: "Biologival cell" from Wikimedia Commons.