Earth Science Learning Community

The Movement of Heat

Lesson Plan

Introduction

We all know the Sun provides energy to our planet and in the Northern Hemisphere we experience seasons and the temperature changes each season. We have learned the planet’s temperature is based on tilt relative to the Sun.

Think about how the Earth is titled and the temperatures at the North Pole, South Pole and equator during different times of the year.

Earth's orbit around the sun. On the left is the southern hemisphere (austral) summer. The right is the northern hemisphere (boreal) summer.  Image from the University of Colorado at Boulder Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics

Now think about temperatures with relation to the Earth’s tilt while revolving around the Sun.

So, as we think of Earth heating up let’s take a moment to think about how some of that heat is moved around the planet. We’ll be conducting experiments and writing down observations and summaries then conclusions in our science journals as we explore how heat energy is transferred.

State Standards:

Essential Question:

How is heat energy transferred?

Lesson Question:

1) What is heat energy?
2) What three ways can heat energy be transferred?
3) Why is it important to understand how heat energy moves and how it climate?

Introduction:

We all know the Sun provides energy to our planet and in the Northern Hemisphere we experience seasons and the temperature changes each season. We have learned the planet’s temperature is based on tilt relative to the Sun. Think about how the Earth is titled and the temperatures at the North Pole, South Pole and equator during different times of the year. Now think about temperatures with relation to the Earth’s tilt while revolving around the Sun. So, as we think of Earth heating up let’s take a moment to think about how some of that heat is moved around the planet. We’ll be conducting experiments and writing down observations and summaries then conclusions in our science journals as we explore how heat energy is transferred.

Task:

Each group will be given an exploration activity to investigate the transfer of heat energy. In your groups, you will conduct an experiment, record and analyze your data, and form a conclusion. Each group will present their finding to the class and be ready to answer any questions about your experiment. You may use any technology to present such as PowerPoint, glogster, prezi, etc...

Lesson Experiences:

Conduction Group
1) Pour hot water into a coffee mug. Record the temperature.
2) Place a room temperature metal spoon in the hot water
3) Use a watch to record the time that it takes the spoon to heat up.
4) Again, record the temperature of the water.
5) Students record in their journals observations and conclusions.

Convection Group:
1) Put tap water in a beaker and record temperature.
2) Place beaker on a hot plate and every 2 minutes record temperature.
3) Record temperature of water in journal.
4) Continue till water is boiling.
5) Students record in their journals observations and conclusions.

Radiation Group:
1) Students fill four cups with tap water.
2) Have students determine the temperature of the water and record.
3) Place cups around classroom: near window, door, shelf and floor
4) Every hour student’s record temperature of water.
5) Students record in their journals observations and conclusions

Extend & Elaborate Activity:
Describe movement of heat and relate to student experiences:
Modes of Heat Transfer:
Conduction: heat transfer resulting from direct contact between substances of different temperatures; heat is transferred from the high-temperature substance to the low by direct molecular interaction.
Convection: heat transport by a moving fluid (gas of liquid). The heat is first transferred to the fluid by conduction, but the fluid motion carries the heat away.
Radiative exchange: heat transfer via electromagnetic waves, the amount of radiant energy emitted, transmitted, or absorbed. (www.woodrow.org)

Students can then explore implications of heat as it relates to greenhouse gases:
http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/greenhouse

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zklNV9ynCTw&feature=player_embedded

Conclusion:

In your groups, you will have gained a basic understanding of the way heat is transferred. Each of your groups will need to explain how the transfer of heat happened and how it happens in the environment and why we should care. To help explain your results and what they mean for climate and society data should be graphed, you may use any graphing software you would like, Excel for example, and the results will displayed for the class during your presentation.

Also, you may also use Prezi to present to the class. This is an excellent way to let your classmates know what you have learned. An example of a Prezi presentation on heat transfer is: http://prezi.com/gyssvgicwasx/heat-transfer/

Assessments:

Students will demonstrate their understanding and integration of scientific concepts in their notes/observations/summary written in their science journals as well as their class presentations.

Science Journal Rubric:

When writing in your science journal, the three important componets are:

1) Describing what you saw in complete sentences.
2) Drawing a diagram with a key or labels
3) Writing down your best scientific thinking for what you saw.


Rubic Dimensions

1 = Novice
2 = Intermediate
3 = Exemplary

Content: 1 = Content is incomplete and inaccurate
2 = Content is accurate, but incomplete
3 = Content is accurate and complete

*(Complete and accurate content is considered information that fully describes in detail how the experiment was done and exactly what was observed and concluded. Remember, your conclusions must be based on what you observed thus providing evidence to back up your conclusions.)

Mechanics: 1 = More than four spelling, grammar, or punctuation errors are included
2 = Three or four spelling, grammar, or punctuation errors are included.
3 = Less than three spelling, grammar, or punctuation errors are included

Organization: 1 = Events jump around, start and end are unclear
2 = Events are somewhat logically ordered
3 = Events are logically ordered

Resources: