Earth Science Learning Community

Extreme Weather

Lesson Plan

Grade Level:

Grades 6-8, ELL

State Standards:

• Use a bilingual or intermediate dictionary to determine word meaning. (ELPBO R.1.e)
• Identify the eight basic parts of speech in the context of a sentence. (ELPBO R.1.9b)
• Demonstrate understanding of academic content words and phrases in selected concept-based categories. (ELPBO S.1.13)

Essential Question:

How might global warming change our everyday lives?

Lesson Question:

What impact will changing ocean temperatures have on extreme weather?

 

 

Introduction:

In this unit, you are going to learn about extreme weather. "Extreme" means weather that is very strong and causes a lot of damage. Extreme weather is usually rare. That means it does not happen a lot. It may happen every decade (10 years) or less.

You are going to explore what might happen with extreme weather if our world continues to change from global warming. You will watch some videos online, practice writing in past and future tenses, and interview a family member!

Task:

Lesson Experiences:

Elicit: With a classmate, discuss some extreme weather events you have seen in the past. What was the extreme weather? Did it cause damage? Was the weather in the United States or your native country? How is the extreme weather different between the two countries?

Engage: Picture the extreme weather you have experienced in the past. What would happen if this weather occurred every year? Every month? How would it change your life? What would the consequences be?

Discuss these questions with a partner. We will share as a class and write ideas on the board.

Explore: In groups, you will watch online videos of extreme weather (icy weather, windy weather and footage from Hurricane Katrina).

Here is the video for Icy Weather:

Here is the video for windy weather:

Here is the video for Hurrican Katrina:

After seeing each video, create a list of adjectives that describe what you saw or how you felt. Use a bilingual dictionary and thesaurus (online is OK) to help you learn new vocabulary words. After, you will create “exploding sentences.” To create "exploding sentences," start with a simple sentence about one of the videos and add multiple adjectives and additional details to make the sentence longer. For example: "The bus slipped on the ice" becomes "The enormous, white bus full of people slipped down the road on the dangerous, glossy, slick ice."

Write your sentence on the piece of long paper and present it to the class. Explain the meanings of new words if your friends find these words to be unfamiliar..

Explain: You will come back together as a group. Your teacher will show you a graph about the relationship between sea temperature and intense hurricanes. We will have a discussion about what may happen with global warming, according to the graph.

Next, your teacher will show you a second graph showing the number of Major Disaster Declarations and Emergency Declaration over the past 60 years. We will discuss the predictions.



Elaborate: In groups, you will create a hypothesis about what will happen if water temperatures continue to rise. You will write your hypothesis on a piece of paper. For example, "If the water temperatures rise I think..." could be the start of a hypothesis; you would complete the sentence. Use future tense].

Evaluate: After, you will work in your group once again to create a Wordle.

The Wordle must include 10 new vocabulary words learned (adjectives from the exploding sentence exercise and discussion about extreme weather) as well as key words from your hypothesis.

While the Wordle displays your words in a fun way, you must also be able to explain what the word means! Make sure everyone in your group is familiar with the definitions. You will present your Wordle to the class and define the words.

 

Extend: Finally, you will interview a family member about their experience with extreme weather. You will write down their responses to the following questions and translate them into English.

Follow the rubric below. You must ask the following questions:

1.What kind of weather was it (hurricane, drought, snow storm etc.)?
2. What happened?
3. When did it happen?
4. Did it happen more than once?
5. Is the weather is getting worse with time or not?

Then show your family member a copy of the graphs we have discussed in class. What is their reaction?

Conclusion:

You are finished! In this unit you learned lots of weather vocabulary, adjectives, and practiced writing in both the future and past tense. You learned about your family history through an interview about a family member's experience with extreme weather. You even got to see into the future about what might happen if we don't take care of our environment.

What do you see in the future? Do you think we can make a difference now and stop this process? What can you do to help?

Assessments:

Things to do 25-20 points 19-15 points 14-10 points 9-5 points 4-0 points
Interview your family member and the questions listed above. You asked all the questions listed above and provided translated, detailed answers given by your family member. You asked all questions and gave me answers but they were not very detailed. You answered 4/5 questions and did not write down a lot of detail. You answered 3/5 questions and did not provide details. You answered less than 3 questions. Did not translate or provide any details.
Use correct grammar in your written interview. You used the past tense and future tense when necessary. You conjugated all your verbs correctly. There are only a few grammar mistakes. You used the past tense and future tense when necessary. You conjugated all your verbs correctly. There are some grammar mistakes. You used the past tense and future tense when necessary but it contained errors. You did not conjugate
all your verbs correctly. There are many grammar mistakes.
You did not use the past tense or future tense. Some of verbs are not conjugated correctly. There are many grammar mistakes. You did not use past or present tense. Your verbs are not conjugated. There are many grammar mistakes and the interview is hard to understand.
Use the vocabulary words we learned in class. You used at least 10 vocabulary words that you or your peers presented during the Wordle or Exploding Sentences activity. You used at least 8 vocabulary words that you or your peers presented during the Wordle or Exploding Sentences activity. You used at least 6 vocabulary words that you or your peers presented during the Wordle or Exploding Sentences activity. You used at least 4 vocabulary words that you or your peers presented during the Wordle or Exploding Sentences activity. You used only 2 (or less) vocabulary words that you or your peers presented during the Wordle or Exploding Sentences activity.
Your written interview is neat, organized and typed. Your interview is organized by listing both question and answer. It looks neat and is typed. Your interview is organized by listing both question and answer. It looks confusing but is typed. Your interview is organized by listing both question and answer. It is not typed but is neat. Your interview is somewhat organized but does not list both question and answer. It may not be neat or typed. Your interview is not organized, typed or neat.

 

Resources:

Teacher Notes: Giving the students the directions on the website alone is not enough. The teacher will have to explain the directions thoroughly providing the students with visual and examples. The teacher should explain the lesson using simple tenses and language.

Alternate Graph 3

 

Alternate Graph 3 Observed Relationship Between Sea Surface Temperatures and Hurricane Power in the North Atlantic Ocean

2009 National Climate Assessment (“Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States”), U.S. Global Change Research Program

 

Alternate Graph 2

Declared Disasters by Year or State on FEMA website

(you will need to select the types)

 

 

 

Image Credits:

Hurriance model

Extreme weather in the US 1980-2011 Ayutthaya Floods.JPG F5 tornado Elie Manitoba 2007.jpg