Energy Learning Community

MOTION

Grade Level:

Kindergarten

State Standards:

Essential Question:

Lesson Questions:

Introduction:

Teacher: Has everyone seen the cartoon Dexter’s Laboratory, on cartoon network?

Student: Yes!

Teacher: What kind of role does Dexter’s character play in his community on that television show ?

Student: He plays the role of a scientist in his community.

Teacher: Is there anybody here who thinks that they know exactly what a scientist is?

Student: Yes! They mix up potions, and make volcanoes erupt.

Teacher: Sure that’s called a chemical reaction, but they also do experiments, and write them down in books, or on the computer to show the whole world if what they predicted, or though would happen did or didn’t happen as proof that they did a test,or experiment.

Student: Ok!

Teacher: We can also call a scientist a person who is an expert in science.

Teacher: Okay friends?

Student: Ok!

Teacher: Now I’m going to show everyone a video where real scientists visit a kindergarten classroom like ours to do a real science experiment with the children at their school.

Teacher: This (YouTube) video is titled
Kindergarten - Loco Motion.

The second video is called
Introduction To Rube Goldberg Machine.

And our last video is called
Rube GoldBerg Machine By Scarfe,Hoefflin,McKune

Student: That was very cool.

Teacher: Shall we watch one more video to further our understanding of Rube Goldberg devices?

Student: Yes, please.

Teacher: Ok here is one final example of a Rube Goldberg Device by Steven Price.

Steve Price (aka "Sprice") Shows Off His Complex Rube Goldberg Machine - America's Got Talent

Teacher: Now here comes the scientific part. We are going to break up into groups of 3-5 scientist, and brainstorm in teams what simple tasks we want our device to finish. Then we'll decide what materials we need to build the device tomorrow.

Task:

Students will work in groups of 3-5 to create Rube Goldberg contraptions that demonstrate the different ways that objects can move (fast, slow, back and forth, zig zag, round and round)

Lesson Experiences:

  1. Students will work in groups of 3-5 to create Rube Goldberg contraptions that demonstrate the different ways that objects can move (fast, slow, back and forth, zig zag, round and round).

    The teacher should encourage students to include as many different ways to move different objects within their contraptions as possible.

  2. After the students have completed their contraptions the teacher should place chart/poster paper by each one that lists the categories for different ways objects can move.

  3. Each group of students will visit another group’s contraption and will complete the open boxes on the chart paper, indicating which of the objects on the contraption moved a particular way and what caused it to move, i.e., a rubber ball used in the contraption moves fast because it rolls down a ramp.

    Students may draw their answers, write their answers or do a combination of both.

  4. The teacher should gather all of the students together to compare the different results on each of the charts.

Conclusion:

The Kindergarten Motion lesson develops students’ prior knowledge of motion and changes in motion through observation and investigation on the playground and high interest classroom investigations.

Assessments:

It's lunch time on the ZOOM set and the cast and crew are hungry!
Can you perfect the ZOOMers' Rube Goldberg invention for serving lunch?
The ZOOMers' say it just needs a few minor adjustments before it can deliver lunch to everybody.

Goldburger ToGo Rubegame

Example of Student Assessment Chart/Poster:

Ways Objects Moved Which Object Moved This Way?
Student Descriptions (drawings and/or
narratives)
What Caused the Object to Move This Way?
Student Descriptions (drawings and/or narratives)
Objects moved fast Write,or draw image (a car) The car went fast down a ramp.
Object moved slow    
object dropped    
Object stopped    
Object moved round and round    
Object moved zig-zag    
Object moved back and forth    

Assessment Rubric

Science Content Standard 2.
Students, through the inquiry process, demonstrate the knowledge of properties, forms, changes and interactions of physical and chemical systems.

Criteria Novice Nearing Proficiency Proficient Advanced
Define the problem Student identifies an object in motion, but cannot identify what type of motion is displayed (i.e. zigzag, round and round, back and forth, and fast and slow). Student identifies some, but not all, the different ways in which objects move, i.e. zigzag, round and round, back and forth, and fast and slow. Student identifies the different ways in which objects move, i.e. zigzag, ound and round, back and forth, and fast and slow. Student uses multiple ways to show differences in which objects move, i.e. zigzag, round and round, back and forth, and fast and slow.

Information Literacy/Library Media Standard 1: A student must identify the task and determine the resources needed.

Criteria Novice Nearing Proficiency Proficient Advanced
Define the Problem C. Student listens and retells the topic omitting most details.
C. Student listens and retells the topic with limited details.
C. Student listens and retells the topic.
C. Student listens and retells the topic with elaborate detail.
Define the Problem D. Student listens to the steps needed to solve the problem or task with frequent redirection. D. Student listens to the steps needed to solve the problem or task with someredirection. D. Student listens to the steps needed to solve the problem or task. D. Student listens to and anticipates the steps needed to solve the problem or task.

 

Resources:

Print Resources:

Online Resources:

Rube Goldberg YouTube Videos:

TEACHER NOTES: