Earth Science Learning Community

Speed, Motion and Distance

Lesson Plan - Determining Motion

Grade Level- 6

State Standards:

MA Curriculum Framework- Grades 6-8 General Science

Physical Science 11. Explain and give examples of how the motion of an object can be described by its position, direction of motion, and speed.


Physical Science 12. Graph and interpret distance vs. time graphs for constant speed.

Essential Question:

Lesson Question:

How can distance be determined and measured?

Introduction:

You have all felt yourself moving, but have you ever wondered how exactly you know you
have moved? Well, there is a way to prove moment and the speed of movement. During this lesson
you will learn how to do that - and prove that something, even you, have moved

Task:

You have all felt yourself moving, but have you ever wondered how exactly you know you have moved? Well, there is a way to prove moment and the speed of movement. During this lesson you will learn how to do that – and prove that something, maybe even you, has moved!

Lesson Experiences:

  1. Students will break into their assigned groups. Each group will read:
    http://www.physics4kids.com/files/motion_intro.html
  2. Each group will designate a walker, recorder, and stopwatch person for each trial. Everyone will rotate roles.
  3. The group will agree on a path and tape the beginning and end. Obstacles may be placed. The path will be no longer than
    100ft.
  4. Students will walk the distance at a “normal speed."
  5. Designated student "timers" record total time required to complete path. The average speed for each student/direction and
    scenario will be calculated, recorded and graphed.
  6. Graphs of each groups' data will be posted around the classroom.
  7. To help further understanding, groups will use the runner simulation app at:
    http://illuminations.nctm.org/LessonDetail.aspx?ID=L417
  8. Each group will present data/results to class and state claim, evidence, and reasoning that motion occurred and
    the need for reference points.

Conclusion:

After completing this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Use elapsed time and distance traveled to derive average speed.
  2. Recognize and use apprpriate units for speed.
  3. Understand the need for a reference point to determine motion.
  4. Understand the concept of velocity and acceleraation.

Assessments:

http://www.brainpop.com/science/motionsforcesandtime/

Graph and calculations
Presentation and writing on claims, evidence, and reasoning that motion occurred and the need for reference points.

Assessment Rubric

Base Rubric for Claim, Evidence, Reasoning, Rebuttal (CERR) Taken From Supporting Grade 5-8 Students in Constructing Explanations in Science: The Claim, Evidence, and Reasoning Framework for Talk and Writing by Katherine McNeill and Joseph Krajcik (2012).

Component

Claim

A statement or conclusion that answers the question asked or the problem posed.

Level 0

Does not make a claim,or makes an inaccurate claim

Level 1

makes and accurate but incomplete claim.

Level 2

Makes an accurate and compplete claim.

Evidence

Scientific data that supports the claim. The data needs to beappropriate and sufficient to support the claim.

Does not provide evidence or provides inappropriate evidence that does not support the claim. Provides appropriate but insufficient evidence to support the claim. May include some inappropriate evidence. Provides appropriate and sufficient evidence to support the claim.

Reasoning

A justification that connects the evidence to the claim. It shows why data counts as evidence by using appropriate and sufficient scientific principles.

Does not provide reasoning, or only provides reasoning that does not link evidence to the claim. Provides reasoning that links the claim and evidence. Repeats the evidence and/or includes some scientific principles, but not sufficient. Provides reasoning that links evidence to claim. Includes appropriate and sufficient scientific principles.

 

Resources:

  1. http://www.physics4kids.com/files/motion_intro.html
  2. http://illuminations.nctm.org/LessonDetail.aspx?ID=L417
  3. http://www.brainpop.com/science/motionsforcesandtime/
  4. Base Rubric for Claim, Evidence, Reasoning, Rebuttal (CERR) Taken From Supporting Grade 5-8 Students in Constructing Explanations in Science: The Claim, Evidence, and Reasoning Framework for Talk and Writing by Katherine McNeill and Joseph Krajcik (2012).-Determining Motion